Page 10              Benjamin Layette Smith’s letters, etc,
         
               Penn got a very nice present a month or two ago for catching up with Sherman
                in latin. It was a double barrel shot gun.
               We trouble Mrs. Turnipseed wright smart sometimes. Once Mr. Turnipseed stepped
                out and I had a very bad cold and cleared up my throat and spit and everyone
               in our room commenced doing it, and that made her so mad that she came in there
                and asked us about it. Everyone of us said it was not me, because she was try-
               ing to rule us and we were determined not to let her do it. When he came in
               she told him of it, and he asked us about it and we told him about it and he
               slapped two or three.
               Charley can talk tolerably well and the baby can set alone a little bit. Pa
               is sick and has been all the spring, but not bed sick: just well enough to at-
               tend to his farm a little. I hope you are well at this time and getting along
               well at school. From your affectionate cousin.
                                                             Lafayette
                                        -------------------------
         
                                                                 July the 6th 1857
         
                    My dear cousin— (Bettie Seay)
                                 I received your letter not long since and was very glad to re-
                    ceive it indeed. You said that you had not received any answer to the one
                    that you had written to me before that. I answered it about the last of March,
                    and Pa wrote some in it too.
                    Cousin I have not much to tell yoU except a little about the crops. The cotton
                    & corn crops are doing very well generally in this neighborhood, except they
                    are a little too grassy. Pa's crop of cotton is later than anybody’s in the
                    neighborhood, but, I believe it is doing as well as others. It did not come
                    up until the first of May. It is clean of grass now, except a very little.
                    His corn crop Is next to the best in the neighborhood, and there is not a bit
                    of grass in it hardly.
                    Our examination came off last Friday: we had a very good dinner that day, and
                    there were a good many people there.
         
                    Mr. Turnipseed is not going to teach next session, because the people will not
                    give him enough money. He wants about $1400, but they will not give it.~to him.
                    We have got another by the name of Olmstrong (Armstrong?) He will commence the
                    first Monday In August.
                    Cousin Sarah was not at the dinner last friday. 1 heard she was going to be
                    Married to a young man by the name Of J. F. Story. Ma Had another little boy
                    about five months old. His name is Curtis Clifford. He can set alone a lit-
                    tle now.
                    Did you know that Bob Toland had been going to school in Aberdeen this year?
                    He has been going there five months, and has come back. He is not going back
                    any more.
                    I liked to have caught the small pox in Columbus not long ago. I went in the
                    same house with a young man that had it. The people were very much alarmed ab-
                    out it for a little while, but, I do not believe any body in this neighborhood
                    caught it, as l have heard of.
                    When you write again you must tell me all of your studies. Mine are Greek -
                    Gramar, Bullions Greek reader, Virgil, Latin Gramar, Algebra and dictionary.
         
                    Sherman and I had three young squirrels last (winter?) and were trying to
                    tame them, but they froze to death one night.
                    There was a sale at Mrs. Belton’s last winter, and I bought two cows & calves,
                    and gave $9.70 for them: now they are worth $40. They are just as fat as they
                    can be now.